Latitude 53 Contemporary Visual Culture

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Soufïa Bensaïd

A little more insight into Soufïa Bensaïd’s project at Visualeyez:

In the same way movement is as primordial to a dancer as breathing, the simple act of movement itself becomes a dance. How can we imagine dancing ones path in life?

How do we yield to dance in a constantly changing world, while struggling with a fragmented social reality, disconnected from the essence? Is life not in continuous flux? How do we learn to accept the ephemerality of things? In accepting, does our practice become one of adaptation, of fluidity, of flexibility, of letting go?

“If we can’t chose the music, we can at least chose how to dance,” wrote Jack Kornfield.

Sometimes we respond unconsciously to the movement of the music. At other times, we resist, when it does not correspond to our expectations, our habits or landmarks. What defines the moment that we cease to resist movement? It is in accepting the unknown – movement dictated by circumstances, its flow imposed (or inspired?) by context, by the specificity of the site – opening to close listening, to surrender, which opens to what we call the performative act, to the immediacy of movement.

What is required of an artistic practice, of preparing the performative presence, to make space for letting go, to tune into the movement already present in a space, to the movement that include us, and surprises us?

What interests me at Visualeyez is taking the risk to not know in advance the outcome. It is about taking the risk to move towards the unknown. To accept ones vulnerability, and the conditions dictated by circumstance, putting them into context, in relationship to the space, to the other, will allow the living essence of the performance shine through.

Come on a walk with her tonight at 9:30, after Gavin Krastin’s performance here at the gallery and Blair Brennan’s at dc3 Art Projects. We’ll meet at Latitude 53.

Nayeon Yang performs at Churchill Square this afternoon, and Pam Patterson’s impromptu response is interrupted by some attention from the police.

Sneak Preview

From Irene Loughlin on the Visualeyez blog:


  Incredible! The sun and heat. I should have left my winter coat at home! This morning after being pummelled in an early morning session of deep tissue work (and when they say that in Edmonton, they mean business) I wove down 106th St wondering what would happen today to amaze me. Visualeyez participants met for the first time around a table at Latitude 53 over mid-morning breakfast, thanks to Robyn O’Brien (Latitude Admin Coordinator) the self-described ‘creepy ghost making toast’! We were also joined by Latitude 53 creatives Karen, Emily and Olivia.
  
  The artists spoke on some of the predicted themes of Visualeyez in relation to movement. Naeyon Yang beautifully articulated her thoughts on scent, which will play a central role in her upcoming work. There is no certain archive in which to hold scent; she therefore proposed that we consider memory as an anchor, a metaphorical container which addresses the problem of scent’s temporality. Todd Janes recounted crossing paths with a coyote last night on his way back from the airport with Naeyon, and reflected on the panicked responses to coyote sightings and the urge to enclose wildlife via environmental colonization and urban sprawl. I posed the question of intentional space in performance and how choosing space affects the artist’s movement in their work.


Read her full post.

Sneak Preview

From Irene Loughlin on the Visualeyez blog:

Incredible! The sun and heat. I should have left my winter coat at home! This morning after being pummelled in an early morning session of deep tissue work (and when they say that in Edmonton, they mean business) I wove down 106th St wondering what would happen today to amaze me. Visualeyez participants met for the first time around a table at Latitude 53 over mid-morning breakfast, thanks to Robyn O’Brien (Latitude Admin Coordinator) the self-described ‘creepy ghost making toast’! We were also joined by Latitude 53 creatives Karen, Emily and Olivia.

The artists spoke on some of the predicted themes of Visualeyez in relation to movement. Naeyon Yang beautifully articulated her thoughts on scent, which will play a central role in her upcoming work. There is no certain archive in which to hold scent; she therefore proposed that we consider memory as an anchor, a metaphorical container which addresses the problem of scent’s temporality. Todd Janes recounted crossing paths with a coyote last night on his way back from the airport with Naeyon, and reflected on the panicked responses to coyote sightings and the urge to enclose wildlife via environmental colonization and urban sprawl. I posed the question of intentional space in performance and how choosing space affects the artist’s movement in their work.

Read her full post.

Soufïa Bensaïd – Not Knowing, Letting it Come

Soufïa Bensaïd’s performance for Visualeyez is about responding in a kind of experiential or improvisational way to the places she is in. Tonight she’ll be making a public performance at the gallery, at about 9—following Gavin Krastin’s Epoxy at 7:30.

Welcome to Visualeyez!

Festival Animator Irene Loughlin made her first post on the Visualeyez blog this morning.

Gavin Krastin will be performing Epoxy, created with Alan Parker, two times during Visualeyez this week—the first is Wednesday at 7:30, here at the gallery.


  Epoxy is a visual and visceral exploration of movement and momentum and the restriction thereof. The body, whilst physically restricted, experiences movement differently. Open and elongated gestures and journeys become labored and frustrated and a different kind of physical grace emerges. This desire to move when the body is confined and petrified offers a corporeal expression of broader themes relating to stasis, stagnation, loss and futility in the face of irrevocable change. Epoxy oscillates between volatility and poise, smooth transparency and languid masking as a solitary, vulnerable performer comes to terms with his plastic anatomy, viscous environment and a genuine desire to move and progress within an inhibiting petrified plastic shell.


Photo: Gavin Krastin’s Rough Musick, from the GIPCA Live Art Festival Archive, 2014.

Gavin Krastin will be performing Epoxy, created with Alan Parker, two times during Visualeyez this week—the first is Wednesday at 7:30, here at the gallery.

Epoxy is a visual and visceral exploration of movement and momentum and the restriction thereof. The body, whilst physically restricted, experiences movement differently. Open and elongated gestures and journeys become labored and frustrated and a different kind of physical grace emerges. This desire to move when the body is confined and petrified offers a corporeal expression of broader themes relating to stasis, stagnation, loss and futility in the face of irrevocable change. Epoxy oscillates between volatility and poise, smooth transparency and languid masking as a solitary, vulnerable performer comes to terms with his plastic anatomy, viscous environment and a genuine desire to move and progress within an inhibiting petrified plastic shell.

Photo: Gavin Krastin’s Rough Musick, from the GIPCA Live Art Festival Archive, 2014.


  History of Emotions / Emotions of Histories starts with the question of what can be archived and remains in a history, or what can be a history. The project fundamentally consists of two parts: a performance and documentation. History of Emotions, the performance, simultaneously processes with Emotions of Histories, which is the documentation of responses of audiences experiencing the performance.


Nayeon Yang is going to be working off-site this week for Visualeyez, with three performances starting Wednesday at Churchill Square at noon, and continuing at the 124 Street Grand Market on Thursday evening and then in Chinatown on Saturday.

History of Emotions / Emotions of Histories starts with the question of what can be archived and remains in a history, or what can be a history. The project fundamentally consists of two parts: a performance and documentation. History of Emotions, the performance, simultaneously processes with Emotions of Histories, which is the documentation of responses of audiences experiencing the performance.

Nayeon Yang is going to be working off-site this week for Visualeyez, with three performances starting Wednesday at Churchill Square at noon, and continuing at the 124 Street Grand Market on Thursday evening and then in Chinatown on Saturday.

Opening tomorrow at SNAP

We’re looking forward to two shows opening Friday at SNAP gallery—including Alberta-born artist Mark Clintberg and one of the stars of our summer Incubator series, Zachary Ayotte. Read about them on SNAP’s website.

Visualeyez 2014: Movement

We’re looking forward to an incredible week of performances next week, featuring Blair Brennan, Soufïa Bensaïd, Marie-Claude Gendron, Gavin Krastin, Nayeon Yang and Pam Patterson. As always, we have invited an artist—this year Irene Loughlin—to act as a guide and interpreter, blogging about the festival and leading discussion. We hope you’ll join us—find the schedule at visualeyez.org.

Visualeyez 2014: Movement

We’re looking forward to an incredible week of performances next week, featuring Blair Brennan, Soufïa Bensaïd, Marie-Claude Gendron, Gavin Krastin, Nayeon Yang and Pam Patterson. As always, we have invited an artist—this year Irene Loughlin—to act as a guide and interpreter, blogging about the festival and leading discussion. We hope you’ll join us—find the schedule at visualeyez.org.

780distro:

hi friends, do you have things you would like to submit to sell in a distro machine? we now have easier ways for you to submit your pieces! you can visit the APIRG office monday to friday from 10 am - 4 pm.

780distro:

hi friends, do you have things you would like to submit to sell in a distro machine? we now have easier ways for you to submit your pieces! you can visit the APIRG office monday to friday from 10 am - 4 pm.