Latitude 53 Contemporary Visual Culture

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Call for Participants

This year’s Visualeyez theme is movement – how the city moves us and how we move the city. We will be looking at our relationship to our urban environments and how we navigate these spaces in our daily lives.

Pam Patterson is an internationally recognized performance artist, educator and scholar based in Toronto and she is looking for individuals and disability artists for a movement-based performance(s) of Brick for Visualeyez Sept. 16-21 2014.

Brick will explore our personal movement patterns, frustrations and found joys. Our “bricks” are the institutions we navigate, the objects we use (or are unable to use), and the relationships we have with both. Our movement-in-context becomes an educational instrument for social change.

The performance is basically a dance/poem with objects: dryers, vacuum cleaners, Lazy boy chairs, low tables…. We will try and make sure you can choose one that “moves” you! Personal assistants are welcome and will participate as creative enablers.

Performers will improvise and repeat in performance three solo/group gestures/aktions/sounds including: an umbrella protest “walk”, a personal “dance” in which you find and repeat a gesture that relates to/supports and powerfully responds to your own movement patterns, and a “dance”-with-object. Still tableaus punctuate the movement piece and work with timed choreography. We may also write a joint poem/text and incorporate this into our own sound scape. Check out Pink Floyd’s “Another Brick in the Wall” .

What we will require from you as a participant:

It is going to be fun and interesting, I think. And enjoying the process is the only reward or incentive I can give you as this is an unpaid gig. Apologies.

Pam Patterson
pampatterson@wiaprojects.com

780distro:

our zine distro at Latitude 53 is stocked full of new zines, you should check it out! 

Latitude 53 Video Podcast

The last show in this year’s Incubator series is by Erin Elizabeth Ross and Jesse Sherburne. Hear them discuss authorship and collaboration, and how this applies to their exhibition, which opens at patio on Thursday August 21st 5-11 PM.

The first Zine produced for Our Day Will Come is available at the gallery on paper—or for download here. It includes contributions by Paul O’Neill, Mo Ossobleh, Jeff Klassen, Kristy Trinier, Mick Wilson, Sara French, Allen Ball, Connor Buchanan, Sergio Serrano, Stacey Cann, Jacqueline Ohm, Chelsea Boos, Jem Noble, and Lori Gawryluik.

The first Zine produced for Our Day Will Come is available at the gallery on paper—or for download here. It includes contributions by Paul O’Neill, Mo Ossobleh, Jeff Klassen, Kristy Trinier, Mick Wilson, Sara French, Allen Ball, Connor Buchanan, Sergio Serrano, Stacey Cann, Jacqueline Ohm, Chelsea Boos, Jem Noble, and Lori Gawryluik.

Patrick Higgins on Natalie McDonald’s Feast

We asked Edmonton painter Patrick Higgins for his view of our recent ProjEx Room show by Natalie McDonald.

From June 19 until July 26th, the ProjEx Room space at Latitude 53 was home to an exhibition titled Feast. It represented a series of acrylic paintings by Calgary based artist, Natalie McDonald. The work conspicuously mines glossy film and print imagery and re-contextualizes them for a suggestive and sometimes provocative experience.

Although the conceptual terrain explored within the Feast series could be fertile ground for all manner of sociological or psychological interpretation, I first responded to how paint meets canvas. As a figurative painter myself, I will own-up to a slavish preoccupation with formalism. It is the saturated and celebratory colour use that got my attention. Recalling her source materials, McDonald’s figures are bathing in a rich Technicolor soup. As with her filmic references, at times the edges of her images vanish and merge with the ground in a deep black. At other times, the viewer’s focus is shifted to what otherwise may have been relegated to the background of a film set and brought front and centre, albeit persistently out-of-focus.

Another point of interest for me is in the way some of the elements of the images are framed. A prominent quality of the work in the exhibition overall is a pronounced and often jarring cropping of the image. A few of the paintings depict a central female figure who may have met the viewers gaze only to have the edge of the canvas cut her head short just below the eyes. Also, what at times looks to be a view from behind of a suited, dapper extra within a larger movie scene is made more of a tension-filled, isolated portrait by McDonald’s encroaching canvas edges.

The stories told by each image no longer have the continuity of a real-time feature length narrative. These paintings are antecedents of mid 20th century, silver-screen narratives. Single frames cut from a rotating film-reel and re-interpreted as still, silent, distant cousins. The viewer is denied the insight of any preceding or upcoming scenes. We are left to wonder what the characters depicted are up to. What are they looking at? Some of the work depicts a whole group of men filling the surface of the canvas, all transfixed with something out of frame, a mystery to us. As mentioned, the integrity of the full frame is apparently interfered with at times so as to focus on select segments of the original image, again re-contextualizing our experience.

The ambiguity that remains within McDonald’s images invites the audience to inject their own meaning. Simultaneously though, one’s lingering sense of familiarity with the source material McDonald uses may or may not be of benefit. McDonald’s paintings hearken back to our shared history as audience members and invoke images that were put to use in another captivating visual language. As such, she attempts to trade in some of the power the screen has had over us. While in the ProjEx Room, I was ever-conscious that I was viewing a re-purposed collection of images to meld my own narrative around, especially when I came across a distracting visage of a youthful Sean Connery. I think that while McDonald generally uses her source imagery to good effect, they can also present a potential obstacle for the viewer.

Natalie McDonald has an assured hand as a painter. She has used film and print media as a base for a fairly complex exploration of imagery and story-telling. If the title, “Feast” is to suggest what Natalie attempts to provide her audience, then she is certainly setting some good goals.

Latitude 53 Video Podcast

The next collaboration in this year’s Incubator series features sculptors Chris Camp and Royden Mills. Hear them discuss the development of their interactive sculpture exhibit, and come to the opening at Patio this Thursday, August 7th.

Tomorrow at Patio we’re launching our first zine from Our Day Will Come, on the theme “What is an exhibition?” Come pick up a copy by donation and see what we’ve been up to!

Tomorrow at Patio we’re launching our first zine from Our Day Will Come, on the theme “What is an exhibition?” Come pick up a copy by donation and see what we’ve been up to!

780distro:

check-it: 780distro buttons! they’re FREE and you can find ‘em at transcend coffee on 109th and latitude 53. grab one before they’re gone! 

We’ve got a new zine of poetry by Lizzie Derksen in this week that looks pretty great. Come get a copy from our machine!

780distro:

check-it: 780distro buttons! they’re FREE and you can find ‘em at transcend coffee on 109th and latitude 53. grab one before they’re gone! 

We’ve got a new zine of poetry by Lizzie Derksen in this week that looks pretty great. Come get a copy from our machine!

Verb Frau TV

We are always excited to follow Margaret Dragu’s projects—watch her latest online through VIVO media arts centre’s site, three times monthly:

MARGARET DRAGU: VERB FRAU TV

Artist Margaret Dragu, aka Verb Woman/Verb Frau, investigates contemporary performance art practice through conversations with international artists, from the new and emerging to the senior and famous. Season 1 is a collection of 15 episodes edited from VERB FRAU Live Streaming TV Broadcasts during her Big European Tour (Berlin and Belgrade), of May 2013.

FAVA Artist-In-Residence

This week FAVA sent us word about their new artist-in-residence, Matthew Rankin, who will be leading some public programming in August:

Matthew is giving an artist talk on August 6 as well as a workshop on August 17. Find out more at fava.ca.